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Commentary

Peter Bruhn Redefines the Lowercase ‘g’

Stephen Coles on August 25, 2007

Unfinished typeface by Peter Bruhn

The Swedish foundry Fountain has released a few very good typefaces in the past few years including Eason, and the swashy Gábor Kóthay blockbusters Zanzibar and Incognito. Proprietor Peter Bruhn’s chops have matured since he first launched Fountain in 1993, but he hasn’t released a retail typeface of his own in several years, focusing instead on proprietary commissions and working with other designers on their fonts.

Fortunately, this is about to change very soon if Bruhn’s blog is any indication. In recent weeks he has given us a sneak peek at typefaces in progress. There’s a script in the spirit of Aldo Novarese’s Fluidum, two revisions of his Corpus Gothic, a strong book typeface called Adrian, a woody grotesque, and a Didot, as seen above, that pushes the boundaries of classic type in a way similar to what Tom Carnase, Herb Lubalin, and Ed Benguiat did in the ’60s–’70s. I don’t think anyone has ever tried a ‘g’ quite like this, though. Marvelous.

12 Comments

  1. Randy Jones says:

    Great to see Peter cranking up the font engine. I must express my concern however. I fear Peter may be struggling through a strong bout of Type Design ADD, a disease I’m all too familiar with. Now that he’s given us this collosal tease of tasty type treats, Lotta must chain him to his desk in the dungeon until he finishes.

    Best wishes for very long, very cold winter in sweden! Can’t wait for spring.

  2. Lotta Bruhn says:

    Two words: Duck Tape :)

  3. Hrant says:

    Nice. Speaking of the “g”, Peter is in fact the author
    of the best Baskerville “g” yet made – no mean feat.

    hhp

  4. Peter Bruhn says:

    It feels much better now that Randy diagnosed me.
    Now I know it’s not my fault, it’s a disease.
    Is laziness a desease too?

    OK, since Stephen decided to kick my butt off the lazy couch — I’m working on making type design schedules for myself now, that I have to follow no matter what.

    Hrant: I can’t take credit for that ‘g’ — it’s all Lars Bergquist’s.

  5. Dyana says:

    Ooh. I’d hang it on my wall.

  6. “g” is for groovy, and this is one groovy “g”.

    Yum!

  7. Randy Jones says:

    Schedule. Ha!

    In my professional opinion, yes, laziness is also a disease. You poor man: with two conflicting diseases it must be like drinking a beer and chasing it with a cup of coffee. Even though it’s not your fault, you still must finish…

    It’s for the good of the children.

  8. Chris Keegan says:

    Nice work as always. How about South? Any idea when that one will be available?

  9. Korodzik says:

    I don’t really like the ‘g’. Mainly due to the middle part.

  10. Peter Bruhn says:

    Chris: South will be available. I just need to make some fixes.

    Korodzik: I understand — the middle part is not for everyone.

  11. COSTAS AGGELETAKIS says:

    Really a new strange but beautiful “g”
    It looks like a “g”, I saw on a Lubalin Poster

  12. micki zurcher says:

    Hello, is the g-Didot available yet?

    thx

    micki z

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Typographica is a review of typefaces and type books, with occasional commentary on fonts and typographic design. Edited by Stephen Coles and designed by Chris Hamamoto. Founded in 2002 by Joshua Lurie-Terrell. Relaunched in 2009 by Coles and Hamamoto.

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